Get Rid of Dandruff

Everyone as dandruff – at least some dandruff – and that includes bald people. That’s because every human scalp sheds dead cells, which “flake” off as new ones are pushed up from deeper skin layers. When “flake” off as new ones are pushed up from deeper skin layers. When these flakes become obvious on your hair and clothing, we call them dandruff. Perfectly natural stuff – but too often, we’re made to feel as though this “problem” falls somewhere between global warming and playing high stakes poker.

In reality, there’s nothing unusual about dandruff, and it definitely doesn’t mean you’re going bald. But here’s on how to remedy this nuisance if you’re itching for some answers.

Prevent it!

  • Bag the mousse. A lot of times we call dandruff is not really a scalp problem at all but rather the result of using hair sprays, styling gels and mousse. Some of these products can cause the flakiness that we think of as dandruff – particularly hair sprays when they’re used to excess.
  • Hit the showers. If you ignore dandruff or the flakiness associated with the use of hair cosmetics, you allow scale to build, resulting in itchiness and possible infection.
  • Take five to do it right. You’ve got to leave shampoo on the scalp for a full five minutes. If you leave it on for less time, you’re undermining the shampoo’s effectiveness.
  • Spread some oil. Massaging some heated pure virgin olive oil into the scalp and then dynamically brush with a natural-bristle hairbrush helps release dandruff scales. You should microwave the oil until it’s warm to the touch and apply it no more than twice a week.
Dandruff

Severe dandruff is actually a disease known as seborrheic dermatitis that requires prescription medications.

  • Beat the tar out of it. If your scalp is oily rather than dry, you’ll see “chunkier” dandruff that looks greasy and has a yellowish tint. Go with a tar-based shampoo such as Ionil T or Neutrogena’s T/Gel. If you have blond or graying hair, however stay away from tar shampoos, because they can give your hair a brownish tint.

 

When to See the Doctor

Severe dandruff is actually a disease known as seborrheic dermatitis that requires prescription medications. See a doctor if you have the following:

  • Scalp irritation or persistent itchiness.
  • Broad scale regardless of regular use of dandruff shampoos.
  • Yellowish crusting.
  • Red patches, mainly along the neckline.

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